I’m going to Arrowmont Craft Center in Gatlinburgh, TN!

ttp://www.arrowmont.org/

To attend a 5 day workshop.

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BREAKING BOUNDARIES: CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO CLOISONNÉ ENAMELING

AUGUST 14, 2016 – AUGUST 20, 2016

RICKY FRANK

The purpose of this class is to discover the art of Cloisonné enameling. The technique refers to the use of a wire within the enamel.

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http://www.rickyfrank.com/

 

5 Things the Artist in you can stop worrying about right NOW! from allison lee at craftcast.com

5 Things the Artist in you can stop worrying about right NOW!

Monday April 2, 2012

#1 Were do I start.
Being an artist comes with the fact of having lots of ideas. Tons and tons of possibilities. The way to curb the “i’ll never get to do everything” or “ where should I start” paralizing anxiety is to simpilify. Pick just one idea and only one. It could be a color you love or a supply you’ve wanted to try. Set a timer, start small even just 15 minutes and take the time to look, think, and day dream. Giving yourself permission to start small and focused will get the creative flow going and chase away the overwhelming anxieties.Remember you can only work on what’s actually in front of you in the moment.

#2 Can I start with a break?
Artists spend lots and lots of alone time. How else could we actually get anything done. Sometimes we need the outside energies to get us going. Having coffee or a walk with a fellow artisian is not always procrastination but away to get the creative pump flowing. Getting out for a hour can save you procrastinating about how to get going in the studio.

#3 So many supplies so little time.
Yes.
Purchasing supplies and tools is addicting. So many beautiful supplies and so little time. If you have a big ol’ stash of supplies, books, and kits, it’s ok. Take sometime to go through your stuff and pull out 3 things that you really, really, want to work with, and pull out 3 that you can let go of and then give them away. It’s all about focus and clean, empty space. It’s impossible to create when the shelves and drawers are so stuffed you can’t even see and enjoy what you have. Simplify.

#4 I’ll never find my voice.
Just like Glinda said to Dorothy in the Wizard of Oz, “You have always had the power my dear.” Your voice is there, maybe just a whisper at first, but just like voice strengthening exercises, “exercising” in your studio will make your “voice” stronger and clear. It’s a process of uncovering, not a desperate search of where could it be.

#5 I don’t think it’s any good.
Just like when I had a horse, if you had a tumble the first thing you did, after checking for anything broken, is get right back on. You never want to have your last memory of leaving the studio as negative and feeling defeated. So if you don’t like what your days efforts created, but it away somewhere and pull out a piece you that you love. Clean up your studio, cut some flowers or pull out some inspiring pix of other peoples work. In other words leave on a high note. You never want to return to the barn fixated on the last ride that ended in a fall. Set it up to always leave feeling on the plus side of things. It will be much easier to walk in the next morning and get started.